Can I Buy a Brighter Lamp for My TV or Projector?

One question we get fairly often is,  “Can I buy a brighter lamp for my projector?”  or, “My TV says it’s a 150 watt bulb. Can I buy a 200 watt bulb?”.

The answer is No.  Thanks for reading!

 

Just kidding…

I take that back.  Technically yes, you can buy a 200 watt bulb for your TV but it will definitely not be brighter.  Front Projector and Rear Projection TV lamps are not the same kind of technology as an Incandescent lamp.  When you put a new bulb in your desk lamp and want it brighter you would look for something with higher wattage and you would get brighter light.  If the old bulb was a 75 watt and you screw in a 100 watt you definitely had more light so why not the same thing on a projector lamp?

Projector lamps rely on a dedicated power supply whose only job is to make sure the lamp installed runs at the proper power rating it is designed for.  The projector lamp ‘takes’ power from the power supply. Where as an incandescent lamp ‘takes’ power from the wall socket.  The projector lamps power supply is designed to run and supply the wattage the lamp is designed for.

For example. Your 200 watt Epson Brightlink 435Wi lamp has a power supply that pushes 200 watts of power to the bulb.  If you put in a 300 watt bulb, the power supply is only going to feed 200 watts of power. That bulb will only put out 200 watts worth of light even though the rating is 300 watts. In some cases it may even put out less than 200 watts worth of light…

It is similar to stereo speakers.  If your stereo has 100 watts per channel and you hook up 200 watt speakers, your stereo is not going to be any louder.  You would need a stereo that put out 200 watt per channel to get more volume(not really that much more but this is about projector lamps so I won’t get into logarithmic increases).

This is why you cannot merely purchase a brighter lamp.  Projectors are designed to run with the wattage lamp for all sorts of reasons.  Mostly cost related but also image quality related.  I have seen people who have installed higher output power supplies into projectors to get more brightness and the image looked washed out.  The contrast suffered because the projector was designed for a certain amount of light to be pushed through and exceeding that caused the image to look poor.

Your best bet for having the brightest picture possible is to minimize light pollution in your “theater” room. Blackout curtains, putting black tape over the myriad of things with indicator LEDs.

The most important things are to make sure your projector is clean and your lamp is new.  That will get you the brightest image every time.

Check out Pureland Supply’s whole series of Epson Lamps here!

 

 

 

 

 

Good Bulb, Bad Bulb, Best Bulb, What Bulb?

Buying a replacement projector lamp should be a very straight forward process.  You find the model number or lamp number and plug it into your search engine of choice and then buy the one that appears.  Anyone who has bought one knows that is not what actually happens.

You end up with a page full of links with prices that can have over a $100 spread of difference in cost.  This can even happen on the same website.  Many sites list a Good, Better and Best option with prices that match.

What is the difference and what bulb should you buy?  These are the two questions I look to answer.  First lets go over what Good, Better, Best and OEM really mean.

The Good lamp is the cheapest.  It is almost always a non-original bulb.  Usually these are made by companies overseas that have older equipment and copy a design with cost in mind over quality.  They are limited by the patents so they use other methods to obtain brightness.  These methods include using Krypton 85 gas where it normally would not be used.  They also tend to have a much lower quality rating over the lifespan.  They tend to fail early and not be as bright.  They are cheap though.  If you only need a few hundred hours then maybe the Good lamp is fine if $25 is your budget.

I mentioned that in this post if you are interested.  These are almost always in a cheaply made housing.  They are sometimes even recycled housings.  A dead lamp will have its bulb removed and new knock-off bulb installed and then re-sold as new.  From the authors point of view, there is no place for these lamps in anyway as there are always reasonably priced options that use more reliable parts but that isn’t the point here.

Keep in mind if you expect the normal 2-3000 hour life-span, the chances are low. Even buying multiple ‘Good lamps’ will end up costing you more in the long term. See my older post here where I explain why.

The “Good’r”, I mean Better lamp can be tricky.  These can be made with Original brand bulbs such as Philips and Osram, but installed in a lower quality housing. The housing is as important as the bulb.  The housing is what makes sure your bulb is properly aligned with the optics.  If the bulb is not aligned, then image may be dim at the least or even melt the internals at the worst.  I personally have seen an NEC that had its iris assembly melted because of a “Better lamp” that had a housing that wasn’t built right.  They also will not have the proper coating on the lens.  I go on about this coating a lot because it is critical for proper color wheel operation. Many of the Better lamps cut corners in places that seem reasonable to the manufacturer, but do not serve the end user very well.

They tend to run in the sub-$100 range, or about 1/3 the cost of an OEM(Original Equipment Manufacturer) lamp.  These can sometimes work just fine.  I have seen “Better” Epson lamps that worked perfectly fine.  The issue I see is that its hit or miss.  There is no consistency in he product lines. You will see these all over Amazon and eBay.  There are some brands that advertise a lot that you will see use terms like DLP in there name. These companies are the ones who tend to use word-soup to ‘inform’ you that you are getting the same lamp as the OEM when in reality you are getting 2 levels down.

In fact these lamps are the ones that I see cause the most problems in the projectors I see. They will have an Osram bulb but the housing will be cheaper and not vented correctly. Then the housing will let the bulb slip and then the bulb melts the internals of the projector.  On average these are about 2/3rd the cost of the Best lamps which means for $40-50 more, the problems would have been avoided.   You spend you money as you see fit, but I strongly advise staying far away from the Better lamps.  At least the cheap lamps will fail before ruining your projector…

The Best lamps are the lamps worth buying if you want to save money over the OEM.  OEM is the top tier cost wise. If you have a high dollar projector and it is under warranty, you may need to buy an OEM lamp when it fails or you may violate your warranty.  I think that is a bad policy but I understand the reasoning.

The Best lamps are as close to OEM as you are going to get without paying OEM prices.  Many time the Best lamps are made the same companies who make the OEM lamps.  They have a deal where once the projector is out of production or our of warranty, they can sell the OEM lamps themselves through non-OEM channels.    These lamps use the same bulb as the OEM and the housing is either exactly the same or has all of the important challenges covered. They use the proper air vent setup and lens coating.  They may also have a heat shield to protect the internals that the Better or Good lamps will not have. Best lamps do not worry about cost as much as quality.  They are always cheaper than OEM. Sometimes they are as much as 60% cheaper, yet they are the same lamp.  As someone who knows what it costs to build a lamp, I also know that OEM’s can cost as much as 300% more than the Best lamps and still be the same thing!

Best lamps are the Best value in my opinion.  They do not cut any of the corners that the Better or Good lamps cut.  They are not overly inflated price-wise and are definitely not lower quality.  In our case, they even have a 6 month(180 day) warranty.  The OEM only has an 80-90 day warranty from the best vendors.

When you inevitably go to purchase a lamp, you will see websites with multiple options. When you do I ask you to go back and read this blog post.  Once you read it, I hope you decide the close those other links and buy one from us, but if you don’t I hope you at least buy what you decide is right for you and do it with the confidence that decided for the right reasons.

Pureland Supply only carries the Best lamps(well we have some OEM) and we only use those with the Original Bulb Inside.  Give us a call or click today and get your projector back to where it was and save some of that money.

 

Why All OEM-Inside Lamps Are Not the Same

Original inside.  OEM Bulb Inside. “100% Authentic Lamps”.  Platinum Lamps. Manufacturer Original Lamps…

Buying a new lamp can be confusing when you have to wade through the marketing campaigns and creative wording.  These are all terms used to describe the type of bulb used in the lamp for your projectors.

This wording could lead you believe these are the same as the manufacturers and in some cases they are.  In other cases they are not.

My goal by the end of this post is to help you understand what you are buying and to make sure you get the best value for your money.

Let’s use a BenQ SP840 projector as an example.   BenQ supplies a lamp inside BenQ SP840 Proejctor with 5J.J2N05.011with a specific bulb.  That bulb is from one of the Six OEM Bulb manufactures in the world. Those manufacturers are Philips, Ushio, Phoenix, Osram, Iwasaki-Eye and Matsushita. No other company makes an original projector lamp. Any other brand of bulb is a compatible. Not worth dwelling on compatibles…

Lets take a step back and look at the beginning of the 5J.J2N05.001 lamp to fully understand the situation.5j.j2n05.011 with Philips 300W bulb inside.

Most manufactures do not make their own Lamp housings.  They contract to another company who has the factory and molding equipment. That factory may make lamps for multiple companies.  In this case the lamp is molded by an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and then labeled as a BenQ part. When the company is designing the lamp with BenQ, they decide on a bulb manufacturer that fits the parameters of the performance they want to get out of the new lamp and projector.

In this case the bulb manufacturer used was Philips.

Philips was the first manufacturer to patent Short Arc Mercury Vapor lamps back in the late 70s.  The original use was for Printer Circuit board manufacturing. Since the market for PCBs is much smaller than projectors, they found the technology was better suited than the original bulbs which used metal halide technology.

Once BenQ and their OEM decided on the Philips UHP bulb, they then design the housing to properly support and align the bulb. Upon completion of the design the OEM manufacturers all the new lamps that BenQ then ships in their SP840.

The OEM also makes quite a few extra and has them boxed in BenQ boxes with the BenQ label.  That way , when a lamp fails under warranty, BenQ replaces it with a BenQ OEM Lamp.  That is what you should get if you see a listing for OEM lamps. It should be in the manufacturers box with the manufacturers label.

These same companies make a lot of the aftermarket versions of the same lamps.

This brings us to the aftermarket lamps. Some vendors list OEM Bulb or 100% Original Bulb when that is not necessarily the case. Some companies will substitute a bulb that is made by one of the main 6 companies in the aftermarket and while its still technically an Original bulb, its not a suitable replacement for any number of reasons.

If your BenQ SP840 needs a new lamp and you look around you will see people selling them with Osram bulbs inside. It is true that Osram makes a bulb of similar specs and the same size but it is not the same. The focal point of the arc tube is in a different place.  While the bulb will light, and display an image the image may not be as bright as the Philips version. It also may cause stray light leakage.  This isn’t Osram’s fault.  They designed the bulb to run properly in another lamp where the Philips may have a focal point miss-match.  The simple reason for this is cost.  It makes it look like you are getting the same-as-the-original when in reality you are not.

The BenQ scenario I explained above is far from exclusive to BenQ. In fact every manufacturer except Panasonic have their lamps made that way.  They all use multiple bulb brands (never in the same model).  Next Ill explain what I mean about Panasonic.

Panasonic is the only company who makes their own bulbs and lamps.  They are owned by Matsushita Heavy Industries.  They are a huge Japanese company who have the capabilities to make their own bulbs and lamps.  Panasonic is the one company you cannot buy aftermarket with their own bulbs inside(unless it ‘fell off the truck’).  Even Epson uses an OEM company called Iwasaki-eye and Philips to make their bulbs.  Panasonic recently bought Sanyo and brought them in under the Matsushita umbrella. I fully expect to see Matsushita bulbs in new Sanyo projectors now.

Up until recently(past 5 years or so) that leaves the consumers only able to buy OEM replacements or Compatible replacements.  Nothing in between.

Fortunately a few years ago Ushio and Phoenix decided it was time to make a replacement that was custom designed to work in place of the Matsushita bulbs. Rather than take an existing bulb and cram it into a reflector, they actually designed the gas mix, the arc tube and refectory to properly recreate the same specs that the Matsushita bulb had. They did it in such a way that did not violate any patents. This gave us a very reasonably priced option for an out-of-warranty projector to use for replacement lamps.

While this was successful, sometimes the vendors who sell these take advantage of the situation and will try and cram a Phoenix into an Epson lamp because the Phoenix bulb is $20 less than the Osram that would work better. They take the stance that, “it fits so it ships” when in reality,  that is doing us a huge disservice.

There are many other aspects to substituting a lamp. When Ushio made their Matsushita replacement, they made sure the heat generated would be dealt with the same as the original. Sellers who do not know what they are doing substitute bulbs they are not checking for things such as cooling or airflow.  They don’t check the focal points of the light or the startup voltage required. Sometimes they will even use a 200W bulb in place of a 150W bulb.  It’ll light, but it’s going to fail early.

Another issue is Counterfeits. I have personally seen counterfeit Ushio bulbs being sold as original by other less than upstanding companies.  Fortunately the amount of counterfeits in the USA are quite low and I don’t see a reason to waste your time ranting about the obvious.

Osram,Philips, Ushio

Pureland Supply only sells Original Bulbs in our lamps. We work very hard at sourcing the lamp with an Original bulb that was used by the OEM company who made that lamp for BenQ(for instance). We don’t stop there though.  We will go as far as purchasing a SP840 and running that lamp for 2000 hours and checking the brightness, CRI, and temperature while operating.  We will go back to our supplier and have them update designs if they are not up to par. We will even go as far as manufacturing our own parts if it means the lamps will be as close to your original as possible.

As an example, we tested 3 different bulbs for the Panasonic ET-LAD60 projector lamp.  We tested Ushio, Phoenix and Osram in their housing inside a projector.

  Total testing took 3 weeks to run all of them.  At the end the data showed the Ushio and Phoenix to be as bright(in some cases brighter) than the Matsushita OEM that was used as a control.

 

Average Lumen output was 3500 for the Matsushita, 3700 Lumen for the Ushio and an average of 3550 for the Phoenix.  After verifying the timer modules were correctly programmed we were able to sell them with confidence. 

 

Where does this leave you the consumer?  Hopefully with a little more insight into where your lamps come from and how to know what is what.

To help further, here are 5 tips to keep in mind while shopping around for your lamp.

  1. Know your bulb type and wattage.  Look at the back of your bulb inside the housing. It will list the specs. Refer to our “How to Identify Your Projector Lamp” for specifics.
  2. Make sure the company you are shopping with has that bulb listed under the lamp type. They may or may not have the bulb wattage listed. If not, do not hesitate to ask them for that info. Any decent company will share that with you.
  3. If they are substituting one original brand for another, be skeptical. Not all substitutes are bad or incorrect mind you, but if you see an Ushio in place of an Osram, I would be very skeptical for the simple reason that Ushio bulbs  generally cost more than Osram bulbs. Again, ask them.  If you were to ask us, we could tell you why we use what we use and what testing we did to confirm its use.
  4. Be wary of any advertisement that uses glowing (no pun intended) for the bulb name.  ie. “Platinum or Gold Lamps”                                                If you need to make a fancy names for your lamps, then maybe it’s not that great of a lamp(just my personal opinion). If it’s not one of the 6 names above, that makes the bulb a compatible and those are a waste of your time and money.
  5. Warranty Status. Unfortunately in the USA, the warranty on your projector can be violated if you use anything other than an OEM  lamp as a replacement. Once your warranty expires you are free to use whatever you want.  Until it expires your warranty can be denied if you were to need service and sent in your projector with a non-OEM lamp.

Hopefully this enlightened your knowledge on why not all Original inside lamps are the same.

I also expect you know how committed Pureland Supply is to carrying a good product. We would much rather sell you a lamp that will perform well for a long time so that you will come back than go for a cheap sale.

You do get what you pay for and if the OEM’s trust the bulbs they use, so do we.

 

 

 

 

 

What Makes a Projector? (Part 2)

LCD Optical Block

Last time we spoke I talked about what makes up a DLP Video Projector.  How it works as well as its Pros and Cons.  From this point forward, I will be discussing what makes another large segment of the projector market, LCD Projectors.

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) is a subtraction display technology versus DLP, DLP Rainbow effectadditive display technology.  DLP Adds layers of colors to make an image where as LCD blocks pixels to take away color for dark area.  One is not better than the other. One of the main advantages of LCD is the lack of a color wheel.  This means one of DLP’s main detriments(rainbowing) is not a concern.

LCD uses 3 colored filters to break the light into Red, Green and Blue.  These are then re-combined before final projection.

LCD Projectors were the first projectors on the market.  They quickly replaced the older and antiquated CRT (cathode ray tube) Projectors.  Their portable size and surprisingly bright image( for the time) was a welcome change.

You would think this type of technology was rather new, but in reality its almost 35 years old.  The first ‘Light Valve’ was pioneered in 1968 at RCA by John van Raalte.  It took until 1984 for him to work out the issues such as being able to control the ‘light valves’ in a meaningful way for a projector.  Since each pixel is arranged in a grid pattern, there needs to be a way to address each pixel.  This also showed the first use of negating the ‘screen door affect’ of each pixel being too obvious and looking like a grid of color.

LCD Panel

It wasn’t until the mid to late 1990s that LCD computer projectors became more common place. Before then, the most common form of LCD projector was a flat panel that was set atop a common overhead projector.

Once the LCD digital projector became common place it rapidly advanced.  At first the contrast was an issue at low brightness’s.  The implementation of an auto iris resolved that.  This Iris physically blocks the lamps light beam at a specific level to balance the light needed to display the color required by the video.

Both LCD and DLP Projectors use lamps and lenses. Everything in between is quite different.

The lamp in an LCD projector starts off by focusing its light through a lens in the front of the lamp. This lens ensures the maximum amount of light hits the first lens of the projector.  The lens ‘ job is to focus the lamp light onto the the next piece of glass which is a color prism.  This prism reduces the light to its core colors of Red, Green and Blue.  The now filtered light is passed through a set of mirrors and multiple Dichroic filters.

LCD Optical Path

The 3 filters further filter the lights to single color channels. Each of the 3 core colors have their own light path and their own LCD panel. Directly prior to passing through the LCD panel the light is balanced by 2 polarized glass panels.  These are adjusted in the factory so that each color is of equal intensity. This is critical because once the light passes through the LCD panel it is now 1/3 of the picture.  It is combined with the other 2 colors to form the full color image.  If any of the 3 colors are more dim or bright than each other, the image will look out of balance and not vivid.

The Lamp in an LCD projector is different as well. POA-LMP125 LCD projector lamp with Ushio bulb inside

The lamps usually have an optical lens rather than a filter lens as in a DLP lamp.  There is no need to block the UV and IR as it leaved the lamp.  The UV is already blocked by the glass, but the IR is not going to affect a color wheel so it can be filtered out after it leaves the lamp.

Around 2010 DLP projectors were surpassing LCD in quality but now the differences can be minuscule in the image quality.  LCD is still quite popular and posses a slightly large part of the home theater market but only barely.

Either projector can serve you well for most purposes.  Once type of lamp is not necessarily more expensive either.  Ideally you want to look at the picture.

If the image looks how you want it to look then LCD is the right technology for your home theater.  Maybe DLP looks better since it does have slightly deeper colors?  At that point it is up to your personal preference.  no matter which you choose you can get your lamp from us with the confidence that you are purchasing from a company who knows lamps.

Tips to Identify Your Projector Lamp

There are thousands of different projector lamps. If you don’t believe me, look at our Website in the Epson Section, as an example.  Epson alone has around 100 different lamps. Last count we had about 3100 unique items with close to 20,000 associated Model numbers. That is a lot of info.

Occasionally we get a call or email asking for a lamp but the customer is not sure of the brand or model.  When you are not the one replacing the lamp and you have to buy the lamp, it can be stressful and difficult without that info.

There are a few tips that I can share that will help. 

First and foremost ask your tech / installer for as much info as possible.  The ideal info is the model number off the projector.  All projectors have a data plate.  Its the sticker or metal plate that has all of the units pertinent info such as the model, serial number, power rating and any certifications.  That plate is usually located on the underside of a projector.  The underside if its sitting on a table. When that is the case, getting that info is easy.

Now say the projector is mounted 30 feet in the air, and you have to rent a lift to get the old lamp out?

The data plate might be blocked by the mount.  It may also have faded from years of sunlight on the sticker.  What can you do?

We have a lot of info at our fingertips.  While we prefer the proper info such as the model number or lamp number, we can usually identify a lamp pretty precisely.

What I am going to teach you is a last ditch option.  After you have exhausted all other options see how this goes.

I’ll start with the useless info.  All housings have numbers on them.  Sometimes they mean things.  Many times they don’t.

Most lamps will list the type of plastic they are made from. This is one of two types.  PPS and LCP.

PPS is Polyphenylene Sulfide. Its a higher temp thermoplastic that usually has some glass fiber re-enforcing.  Commonly listed as PPS-GF40 (Polyphenylene Sulfide Glass fiber 40%).  You can visually tell by the look of the plastic.  It will be glossy and hard.

The other kind of plastic used is LCP (liquid Crystal Polymer).  It is no better or worse.  I can only speculate on why one would be used over another as they compare almost the same with only negligible differences.

If you see PPS-GF40/GF30 or LCP-GF40, you can ignore those numbers.  They are only useful to the plastic recycling center.

There may also be a 2 digit number. That is usually a mold ID.  When the lamp housing was molded it was done so in a mold that had a number in it. That is for quality tracking.  Also not much help for finding your mystery lamp.

There may be other random letters and numbers. Most of them will be useless.

Here is what you WANT to look for.

Flip the lamp over and look at the back of your bulb.  Most lamps will have markings on the bulb unless its a cheap knock off.  You know how I feel about those.

That bulb will have some numbers.  Those will be helpful. They may not ID the lamp entirely but it will narrow it down immensely.

Refer to this chart:

Ushio:  Look for NSHxxxY(x= numbers, y= letter suffix)  or NSHAxxxY.  NSH refers to a DC (direct current bulb) and should have at least one wire physically attached. NSHA is for AC(alternating current bulb) and will have 2-3 terminals that can have a connector attached via screws. Many Ushio bulbs are purpose made for a specific manufacturer.  For instance, NSH200EDC is a 200W DC lamp made for Eiki with 3 terminals instead of 2.

Philips:  The first number on the sticker is the part number.  In this image the 636 is the part #.  The 90 indicates that this is an aftermarket bulb for Original Inside lamps.
UHP Philips Bulb
We can match that info to a handful of lamps.

Osram:  There will be a sticker on the reflector or text on the read of the ceramic. You are looking for the “PVIP” data.  It will say P-VIP xxx(x= wattage) then the arc gap(1.0 or 0.9 or 0.8) which is the spacing in millimeters inside the arc-tube.  Then the reflector size which will be a P (for parabolic) or E( for elliptical) and a number.

Phoenix: This is the most difficult but fortunately its also rare.  There will be a short number such as SHPxx on an OEM.  The aftermarket lamps are harder.  They use a 3 character listing such as GX4 or SX5.  They have the wires permanently attached and usually are in older lamps.  Even so, if we know you need a lamp with a Phoenix bulb it will still eliminate a lot of variables.

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Knowing the brand of the projector will then get us even closer if not to the exact model.

Lastly take a picture for us.  We look at lamps all day long. Whether in our Quality Control Department or by our warehouse staff, some of us can ID a lamp by just seeing it.

Set the lamp on a nice clear background.  White table or solid lighter colored surface.  Put a piece of paper under it if you aren’t sure.  Then take a picture looking straight down. Make sure to get the connector in the shot.  Then take another from the bottom with the lamp flipped over.

Refer to the image below. The first two pictures show a POA-LMP94 from a PLV-Z4 /PLV-Z5.  The third picture is the same lamp but while its a ‘nice’ picture, its not recognizable as easily.

Ideally of course, get the model number.  Even if you have what you believe is the proper Lamp ID , use the Model number.  It is the best way to guarantee you are sent exactly what you need and nothing less.

We can ID most lamps the same day as our staff is highly trained and well versed in finding the lamp you need. Contact us Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm via phone or Chat or anytime at Sales@Purelandsupply.com and we will reply the following business day.

Congratulations to the Philadelphia Eagles..and your Projector!

Congratulations to the 2018 Super Bowl winners, the Philadelphia Eagles!

Being a company based out of the Philadelphia area, we have a lot of Eagles fans who work here.

While New England played hard, it was nice to see the Eagles play a little harder.  The same can be said for your video projector.  Each projector is an engineering marvel that balances cost with function.

Think of your lamp like the Quarterback.  The lamps job is to pass light through the optics to the end-zone/screen.  Your lamp is constantly at odds with elements looking to make it fail.

Heat and dust are working hard to chip away at your lamp life, but the supporting members of your projector team work to protect it. The cooling fans are the Lamp’s Guards, while the filter is the Lamp’s Fullback. The rest of the team has its own purposes to ensure long life and clear pictures of your projector.

With the Football Season over for now, its a great time to start planning for next season.  4K projectors are becoming more reasonably priced and their lamps are some of the brightest to be made yet for the price range.

You can use the next few months to decide the best course of action to install your new projector or put your old projector into “pre season training” by making sure its been cleaned and replacing your lamp if its nearing the end of its life or starting to look dim. Its better to change your lamp before it fails.  You can save the old one as a back up and return the unit to its original brightness.

If you are looking to upgrade a good example is the BenQ HT2550 projector.

BenQ HT2550

This is a true 4K (3840×2160)model rather than an enhanced 1080p (1920 x 1080)Projector like the Home Cinema 4000 .  The BenQ HT2550 retails for around $1,500.  Unlike the Sim2 Crystal 4 UHD which is 10x the price.

The BenQ projector has almost the same specs as the Sim2.  While Sim2 is a fantastic brand, it is not the most affordable and is not an entry level of average consumer level unit.

Sim2

Pureland Supply offers a lamp for each of these unit.  You can search for this BenQ or your model BenQ via our Manufacturers page.  It lists every model and lamp for you to browse through, or you can use the search function to find your specific model or lamp number.

Of course if you are unable to find the model you are looking for or have any questions at all, our team at PurelandSupply is ready to help you with any of your projector lamp questions.

Give us a chance to support your projector for the rest of 2018. Contact us at 1-800-664-6671 via Phone or Online Chat Monday-Friday 9am to 5pm Est. We can also be contacted via email 24/7 at Sales@purelandsupply.com.  

Logo image for Pureland Supply

GO EAGLES!!

6 Steps to Change Your Projector Lamp

                                                   

Here are 6 Basic Steps for Lamp Replacement. 

You should always refer to the owners manual for the proper specific steps but if you have a pretty basic Projector or Rear Projection TV, these steps should get you back up and running.
    1. Preparing the Projector to Be Opened
Before attempting to open the projector, users should turn off and unplug the device. They should also allow the device to cool down. It could take anywhere from 30 to 45 minutes for the projector to cool down completely. Then remove any dust on the outside casing with a soft, dry, and clean cloth. This will ensure that dust does not enter into the machine and get onto the vulnerable interior parts.

2. Remove Lamp Access Door
Some projectors may have covers that come off completely while other models just have a smaller compartment door that gives users access to the lamp housing unit. Projector owners can determine what kind of opening they have by looking at the projector and consulting the manual. 

No matter what the cover or the compartment door must be opened.  You will most likely need a screwdriverto remove the screws that keep the cover or door closed. Once the screws have been removed, you can carefully remove the panel or door. You should also take the time to unscrew any screws that may be keeping the housing unit of the lamp in place before attempting to remove it.

3. Taking Out the Old Projector Lamp 
This is a step that users must take care to complete properly. Doing otherwise may cause the old projector lamp to burst, which is dangerous for both the projector and the user. Because projector Bulbs inside the lamps are very fragile.  They can burst after starting because they have come into contact with the natural oils that are present on fingers.  this causes the glass of the bulb to expand at different rates when it heats.  For this reason you should always use the handle on the lamp to pull it out.  As an example the Christie 003-120507-01 

lamp has two points on the bottom to grab the lamp for removal.


4. Putting In the New Lamp
Once the old lamp is removed, the user can then place the new lamp housing unit inside of the Projector/TV. Users should make sure to slide the housing unit fully into the projector, with the new lamp in the same position that the old one was in. Certain projectors may require that power cables be reconnected to the new lamp. If this is the case, users should follow the manuals for specific instructions on how to do this.


5. Getting the Projector Ready to Run Again

   When the switch has been made, you can screw the new lamp housing unit into place and then re-attach the lamp access panel. Be sure to not over-tighten the screws.  At this point, the users can reconnect the projector to the electrical outlet and turn on the project to see if the new lamp works. If the projector still does not work after the lamp replacement has been made, there may be a larger issue that is causing the problem. In this case, users should seek the help of professionals specializing in projector repair in order to determine the right course of action.


6. Resetting the Lamp timer
If the projector is working properly, then the user will need to reset the lamp counter so that it can begin tracking time for the new lamp that has just been installed. Some projectors might reset lamp counters automatically, but for those that do not, users may need to do this manually through the projector menu. After completing all of these steps, the projector should be ready to provide hours and hours of entertainment once again.
If at any point you are uncomfortable or unable to perform these steps, please do not hesitate to contact our world class customer service department for assistance.  We have one of if not the best trained representatives to help you with your problems.

We can be reaching by calling our office at 1-800-664-6671. You can also email us at Sales@PurelandSupply.com 

5 Tips on How to Maintain your Video Projector

 

    Projectors are fragile, expensive pieces of equipment that can perform for years if treated properly. Performing routine maintenance to the various parts of your projector (i.e. the filters, lamp, etc) will help to ensure that you are creating the best environment for your projector to operate. There are certain precautions you can take when using your projector on a regular basis that will improve your the lifespan and protect your investment.

 
1. ARM (Always Read the Manual)
 
   Yes, the manual.  That plastic bag with the paper booklet that you toss in the drawer after pulling the remote batteries out of the bag. That manual is the best resource you have at your fingertips.  Every projector being sold today will have an operating manual in either hard copy or electronic format. Taking the time to read through the operating manual in detail before using the projector is the best way to begin. It will instruct you on the correct way to operate your projector. Your operating manual can also provide helpful maintenance tips that are just for your projector model, i.e. how to remove your projector’s filter cover. Even if you have experience running projectors, each model has their own unique settings and features that might be different than what you are used to. Familiarizing yourself with how that particular piece of equipment works will allow you to tell when something is wrong, and maybe advise on how to take preventative measures to stop things from going wrong in the first place.  
 
2. Choose your Projector Location Wisely.
 
   There is more to positioning your projector than just finding out where the image will look the best. Its imperative to leave at least 6-12 inches of space around the unit to allow for proper heat ventilation. Without proper ventilation the heat that builds up in your projector cannot escape, which can cause damage to the projector’s internal parts and drastically shorten your lamp life.
projector placement
 
Know the temperature your projector operates at. If you think the unit produces a lot of heat, it would be best to avoid placing the projector directly in the path of sunlight or directly next to a heat source(heating vent, wood stove etc). If you have the projector mounted on the ceiling check to make sure that the projector is not directly next to an outgoing vent. The last thing you want is more heat around the projector than it is already producing itself.
It’s also a good idea to not use the projector in smoke filled rooms. This can increase the chance of damaging the projector optics. Smoke will build up on the internal lenses.  That causes the image to dim and in some cases it can cause the lenses inside to fail.
 
Keeping your projector’s environment as dust and dirt free as possible will help as well. Electronics attract more dust than other objects due to the static electricity they create while in use. Dust causes problems for the projector’s filters, and other components if the dust particles get further into the projector.  Routinely clean the air vents if you can. Clean projectors are cool and happy projectors.
 
 
3. Storing your Projector  
projector storage

 

 
   Hopefully you use it regularly but for people who use them for presentations primary, this tip is for you.  
Projectors have many parts that need precise alignment to function correctly. Improper transportation or storage of the projector may cause adverse affects for the performance of the projector. The following are a few guidelines for storing your projector:
  • Allow the projector to completely cool down before moving it.
  • Use the original box and packing materials to store the projector if possible. If the original packaging materials are not an option, use a strong box to hold the projector securely and at least 2 inches of a soft material (i.e. cloth, foam, etc) all the way around the projector.
  • Remove the batteries from the remote control.
  • When storing the projector make sure that the storage area will not be subjected to extreme temperatures (hot or cold) that could affect the projector.
  • If you move a projector from one temperature extreme to the other, let it sit for 30 minutes or so until it rises or lowers to room temperature. This prevents moisture problems.
4. Clean your Projector Filters
 
Projectors produce large amounts of heat during use, and this heat needs to be vented to keep the projector from overheating. Projectors have fans that push air around the projector’s operating parts to cool them down, but the air contains dust and other particles that need to be filtered before it cools these components. The filters prevent the buildup of dust that, if left unchecked, would actually insulate the projector. This would keep the heat inside the projector unit which could be very damaging to many of the projector’s components like the lamp, LCD panels, or other internal optics.
 
To ensure that these filters keep performing well, they must be maintained regularly. This is very important since damage to the projector caused by dirty filters may not be covered by the projector warranty.
 
Generally, it is suggested to clean the filters once every 3-4 months(Now is always a good time),.  Always check the projector’s manual first to see if there is a recommended maintenance cycle for your projector. You should clean or replace your filters whenever you notice an excessive build up of dust on the projector’s fan exhaust vent, or if you have been using the projector on a frequent basis. Most projectors will also have a temperature warning LED. If you notice this warning LED occurring, it may be time to clean your filter.
 
The two preferred ways to clean the filter are either to use a small vacuum cleaner attachment to pull the dust out from the filter, or to use a can of compressed air to blow the dust away. Washing the filter with a cleaning solution, or soap and water is generally not recommended as the chemicals in them could harm the filter membranes. 
 
 
5. Cleaning the Projector’s Compartments
 
dirty projector
  Before you re-install the clean filters or new replacement lamp, make sure to remove all the dust and dirt from the compartments they are housed in. Using the same vacuum cleaner attachment or can of compressed air you used to clean the filters you can remove the excess dust from the compartments as well. It is also time to check the vent fan area for debris buildup. If the fans compartment contains dust and debris it could prevent the fan from operating at the correct speed needed to ventilate the heat that is being produced. 
 
Occasionally the old lamp will burst leaving bits of quartz glass scattered throughout the projector.  That debris can clog fans, preventing cooling.  I have seen that more often than I expected.
Keeping the fans clear of dust and debris is the best first live of defense against early lamp failure.
 
These 5 tips will keep your projector working between lamp changes.  When its time for a lamp, give us a call at 1-800-664-6671 or visit out website www.PurelandSupply.com
 
 
 
 

Happy New Year from Pureland Supply!

From all of us at Pureland Supply, We wish you a happy and prosperous New Year!

2017 was a fantastic year for Pureland Supply.  We continued to improve our quality and enhance our competitive pricing to ensure maximum value to our customers.  

We plan to make 2018 even better yet.  Keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page for upcoming specials.  We are giving back even more than ever.  2018 is the year for Kindness and Prosperity. 

Until January 15th, we are donating One dollar ($1)for every Facebook Page follow we receive to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to help fund the Adolescent Initiative program.

This program assists with clinical opportunities, education, and provides a safe family gathering event for young adults in high risk HIV environments.

Join us in kicking off the New Year by helping the children.  You do not have to purchase anything.  Head on over via the link to our Facebook page and click the Follow Button. That’s it!


We look forward to sharing more information on Projector Lamp tips, tricks and best practices. 

As always, thank you for using PurelandSupply.com for your Projector Lamp needs as we are 

Your Source For Replacement Projector Lamps


10 Tips to Prolong Lamp Life from Pureland Supply

Projector lamps are most important to your projector. Prolong their life with these tips.

1.  Handle the Projector Lamp with gloves. Oils and deposits from hands and fingers can cause hot spots on face of the Projector Lamp, which may result in premature Lamp failure.  Gloves also insure against any smudges that could get on the glass lenses or the projector or the lamp itself.
2.  Operate your projector in a clean, cool, and well ventilated area. A dust free environment would be ideal.  It may be advantageous to look into a ventilation system or air filtration system in the area that the projector will be operating in.
3.  Keep the projector air filters and air vents clean. Clogged filters/vents will not remove heat effectively. This can cause the projector to overheat with an early lamp failure.  During routine maintenance it is recommended to vacuum any loose debris and dust from the projector.  You can also get a can of sealed air to blast out any small particles and dust from the air vents and filter.
4.  Do not place anything on top of the projector or in front of the intake or exhaust vents. This will cause the projector lamp to overheat and fail. Refer to your manual for safe placement of the projector and the accessories.  The vents should be operating in an unrestricted environment that has strong air circulation.
5.  If the projector is built into a compartment, wall, ceiling, or shelf mount, the minimum distance requirement is usually at least 2 feet.  This allows enough space to dissipate any heat that will build up.  Refer to your owner’s manual for specific recommendations.
6.  When you replace the projector lamp make sure the new housing is seated completely and securely. Pureland Supply continually gets phone calls and inquiries from customers that think they have a defective lamp when in actuality they simply didn’t push the lamp in far enough.  Pay attention to the old lamp. Re-install and remove the old lamp a few times to get familiar with the how it fit into your projector. When you install the new lamp you can seat it firmly but without too much pressure.  Use the screws to tighten the lamp into its final position.
7.  Hot Projector Lamps are fragile. Do not move or shake the projector until the Projector Lamp has completely cooled. Shock and vibration applied to hot projector lamps may cause the lamp to break or shorten its effective lifespan.  It is recommended that after operation you let the lamp cool at least an hour before handling the projector or lamp.
8.  Do not unplug the projector until the Lamp has properly cooled. After the projector has been shut off, the fan will remain on for a period. This is required for proper cooling of the lamp.  If the lamp is not cooled properly it will cause the life of the lamp to be shortened drastically.  This is a critical point where many people unplug their projector during use in order to turn it off.  By doing this the lamp is extremely hot and has no air circulation resulting in damage or shortened life of the lamp.
9.  Do not turn the projector on and off frequently during presentations. Each time the projector is switched on, the inrush of power causes stress on the Projector Lamp as does the thermal cycles (heating cooling). Try to minimize your on/ off cycles by not frequently turning on and off. If you are not using the unit for less than 30minutes, use a screen saver or video mute option that some models offer.
10.   Wait until the fans stop running before attempting to turn a projector back on after use. Forcing the Projector Lamp to start before it is adequately cool will cause a thermal and electrical shock to the bulb causing the life to be shortened.
It is recommended that you have your projector serviced and maintained approximately every 2 years.
Preferably have the projector cleaned for dust buildup seasonally.
Insist on high quality projector lamps with the original manufacturer’s bulb inside (Made by Philips, Ushio, Phoenix, or Osram).  All lamps are available for sale at PurelandSupply
Call or Visit Pureland Supply at 1-800-664-6671 to get additional information on any type of Projector Lamp.
Pureland Supply
210 Gale Lane
Kennett Square PA  19348
Phone: 800-664-6671

Fax: 888-880-8874