Did I Buy a Counterfeit Lamp?

How do you tell if this OEM Philips bulb is really an OEM?

There is the cost. Was the lamp 50% less than most of the other listings of the same lamp?

Real DT01291 w/ Original Philips UHP Bulb Inside

Let’s use a Hitachi DT01291 replacement lamp. This is used in over two dozen units across four manufactures(Hitachi, Dukane, Christie, and Infocus). The original bulb is a Philips UHP 330W. This is a higher wattage bulb and not an easy one to substitute.

I purchased one of these half priced lamps myself to see how they could sell it so cheap (well under the cost of the real bulb itself!). After having to wait 2 weeks for the 2-day air shipment I paid for, the lamp arrived. It was stuffed into a USPS box with some paper as padding. Fortunately the lamp was also inside a box with some foam or it would have been damaged.

Bad housing for DT01291

First thing I noticed was the housing. The plastic was cheap looking. There were fingerprints on the lens (big no no) and there was a paper warranty sticker on the seam of the housing. The edges of the housing were sloppy. The mold used was obviously well worn. It was probably from an original lamp and had been discarded and then re-used by the housing company who made this particular housing. I may be wrong but in seeing where they blanked out the OEM name on the side, I suspect I am not. While not terrible or dangerous, having a substandard housing can cause cooling problems and alignment problems with the projector.

Next thing I looked at was the bulb itself. Philips has a very specific set of part numbers/codes used to track their bulbs. Each bulb can be traced back to where it was made and when and even who it was sold to.

Counterfeit Philips bulb
This is a real looking ceramic label, not enough to indicate if it is counterfeit or not.

The ceramic label on the side was the first code I look at. This particular bulb said ‘452/53 330/264W 1.0’ . Under it is the rest of the serial #, date code and manufacturer location code. That in itself looked OK. It wasnt until I turned the bulb over and noticed a piece of info that seemed to contradict the label. There is a serial number printed directly on the reflector. If it was a real Philips 452/53 bulb, the serial number on the bulb would have an aftermarket designation, “AMxxxxx”. This bulb had a new construction serial number. Meaning the bulb was made to be sold inside a new projector rather than a replacement lamp. The serial number as just the numbers without the ‘AM(aftermarket)’ in the front. This made me very suspicious…

The next and most definite place to look is at the arc tube/burner (referred to as burner from here on).

The burner is the glass tube that actually makes the light. This is the part that unscrupulous companies put into used bulbs by clearing out the old burner and cementing in a new burner. They then pass them off as new OEM bulbs.

The OEM burner should have another serial number actually molded into the end of the burner near the tip. You should be able to read it or at least see that its there. If there is no serial number and the bulb is supposed to be an OEM, you can safely believe it to be counterfeit.

Counterfeit Philips 452 bulb
No Serial number was etched/molded into the burner.
All OEM Philips Bulbs have a serial number on the end.

I even went as far as to contact Philips directly and they were able to confirm my findings. The bulb here was sold originally to a real company and was then likely sent back as a recycle bulb. Normally the bulbs are crushed and used to make new glass(it’s good quality glass). In this case the bulb had the old burner removed and new, non-oem burner cemented it.

This is how the company was able to sell what they called an OEM bulb inside for more than half the cost of everyone else.

Being that I can’t confirm they are doing it on purpose, I will not be disclosing their name. It really doesn’t matter as there are many companies doing this. This company just happened to be the one I bought from.

It is up to you as a consumer to make an informed choice. The too-good-to-be-true holds fast here.

If you aren’t sure if the deal you are seeing is worth it, I would recommend calling around. Call us of course (1-800-664-6671) as we can guarantee our lamps are properly made without replaced burners or counterfeit bulbs. The pricing should be within $20-30 or so no matter who you call. If the price is $100 less with one company, you can figure they have a counterfeit lamp and play it safe buying it elsewhere.

Can I Buy a Brighter Lamp for My TV or Projector?

One question we get fairly often is,  “Can I buy a brighter lamp for my projector?”  or, “My TV says it’s a 150 watt bulb. Can I buy a 200 watt bulb?”.

The answer is No.  Thanks for reading!

 

Just kidding…

I take that back.  Technically yes, you can buy a 200 watt bulb for your TV but it will definitely not be brighter.  Front Projector and Rear Projection TV lamps are not the same kind of technology as an Incandescent lamp.  When you put a new bulb in your desk lamp and want it brighter you would look for something with higher wattage and you would get brighter light.  If the old bulb was a 75 watt and you screw in a 100 watt you definitely had more light so why not the same thing on a projector lamp?

Projector lamps rely on a dedicated power supply whose only job is to make sure the lamp installed runs at the proper power rating it is designed for.  The projector lamp ‘takes’ power from the power supply. Where as an incandescent lamp ‘takes’ power from the wall socket.  The projector lamps power supply is designed to run and supply the wattage the lamp is designed for.

For example. Your 200 watt Epson Brightlink 435Wi lamp has a power supply that pushes 200 watts of power to the bulb.  If you put in a 300 watt bulb, the power supply is only going to feed 200 watts of power. That bulb will only put out 200 watts worth of light even though the rating is 300 watts. In some cases it may even put out less than 200 watts worth of light…

It is similar to stereo speakers.  If your stereo has 100 watts per channel and you hook up 200 watt speakers, your stereo is not going to be any louder.  You would need a stereo that put out 200 watt per channel to get more volume(not really that much more but this is about projector lamps so I won’t get into logarithmic increases).

This is why you cannot merely purchase a brighter lamp.  Projectors are designed to run with the wattage lamp for all sorts of reasons.  Mostly cost related but also image quality related.  I have seen people who have installed higher output power supplies into projectors to get more brightness and the image looked washed out.  The contrast suffered because the projector was designed for a certain amount of light to be pushed through and exceeding that caused the image to look poor.

Your best bet for having the brightest picture possible is to minimize light pollution in your “theater” room. Blackout curtains, putting black tape over the myriad of things with indicator LEDs.

The most important things are to make sure your projector is clean and your lamp is new.  That will get you the brightest image every time.

Check out Pureland Supply’s whole series of Epson Lamps here!

 

 

 

 

 

What Makes a Projector? (Part 2)

LCD Optical Block

Last time we spoke I talked about what makes up a DLP Video Projector.  How it works as well as its Pros and Cons.  From this point forward, I will be discussing what makes another large segment of the projector market, LCD Projectors.

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) is a subtraction display technology versus DLP, DLP Rainbow effectadditive display technology.  DLP Adds layers of colors to make an image where as LCD blocks pixels to take away color for dark area.  One is not better than the other. One of the main advantages of LCD is the lack of a color wheel.  This means one of DLP’s main detriments(rainbowing) is not a concern.

LCD uses 3 colored filters to break the light into Red, Green and Blue.  These are then re-combined before final projection.

LCD Projectors were the first projectors on the market.  They quickly replaced the older and antiquated CRT (cathode ray tube) Projectors.  Their portable size and surprisingly bright image( for the time) was a welcome change.

You would think this type of technology was rather new, but in reality its almost 35 years old.  The first ‘Light Valve’ was pioneered in 1968 at RCA by John van Raalte.  It took until 1984 for him to work out the issues such as being able to control the ‘light valves’ in a meaningful way for a projector.  Since each pixel is arranged in a grid pattern, there needs to be a way to address each pixel.  This also showed the first use of negating the ‘screen door affect’ of each pixel being too obvious and looking like a grid of color.

LCD Panel

It wasn’t until the mid to late 1990s that LCD computer projectors became more common place. Before then, the most common form of LCD projector was a flat panel that was set atop a common overhead projector.

Once the LCD digital projector became common place it rapidly advanced.  At first the contrast was an issue at low brightness’s.  The implementation of an auto iris resolved that.  This Iris physically blocks the lamps light beam at a specific level to balance the light needed to display the color required by the video.

Both LCD and DLP Projectors use lamps and lenses. Everything in between is quite different.

The lamp in an LCD projector starts off by focusing its light through a lens in the front of the lamp. This lens ensures the maximum amount of light hits the first lens of the projector.  The lens ‘ job is to focus the lamp light onto the the next piece of glass which is a color prism.  This prism reduces the light to its core colors of Red, Green and Blue.  The now filtered light is passed through a set of mirrors and multiple Dichroic filters.

LCD Optical Path

The 3 filters further filter the lights to single color channels. Each of the 3 core colors have their own light path and their own LCD panel. Directly prior to passing through the LCD panel the light is balanced by 2 polarized glass panels.  These are adjusted in the factory so that each color is of equal intensity. This is critical because once the light passes through the LCD panel it is now 1/3 of the picture.  It is combined with the other 2 colors to form the full color image.  If any of the 3 colors are more dim or bright than each other, the image will look out of balance and not vivid.

The Lamp in an LCD projector is different as well. POA-LMP125 LCD projector lamp with Ushio bulb inside

The lamps usually have an optical lens rather than a filter lens as in a DLP lamp.  There is no need to block the UV and IR as it leaved the lamp.  The UV is already blocked by the glass, but the IR is not going to affect a color wheel so it can be filtered out after it leaves the lamp.

Around 2010 DLP projectors were surpassing LCD in quality but now the differences can be minuscule in the image quality.  LCD is still quite popular and posses a slightly large part of the home theater market but only barely.

Either projector can serve you well for most purposes.  Once type of lamp is not necessarily more expensive either.  Ideally you want to look at the picture.

If the image looks how you want it to look then LCD is the right technology for your home theater.  Maybe DLP looks better since it does have slightly deeper colors?  At that point it is up to your personal preference.  no matter which you choose you can get your lamp from us with the confidence that you are purchasing from a company who knows lamps.

Is My Lamp Failing?

How to tell if the Lamp in your Projector or Rear Projection TV has Failed or is About to Fail

Most problems on these TV’s are due to lamp problems.  For brand-specific help, just click the appropriate link for your Hitachi, JVC, Mitsubishi, Sony, or Toshiba TV.

Projector lamps from Pureland Supply are only used in Projectors or TVs that use LCD, DLP, D-ILA and LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) display chips. These utilize patented Short Arc technology utilized by Philips, Ushio, Phoenix and Osram.
Projector lamps can easily be replaced by a customer commonly needing nothing more than a screwdriver.  If a special tool is required, it comes packaged with the new lamp.  We stock all popular projection lamps for sale for all brands with Original Bulbs Inside.  There are no replaceable lamps in flat panel TV’s (plasma, LCD, and LED TV’s), traditional direct view TV’s, and the old floor-standing CRT rear projection TV’s.
An On Screen Menu is a pattern of text on the screen that the TV generates internally, like the TV menu you get by using the TV remote.  This is the volume display, channel display, input display, etc. If you can see an ON SCREEN MENU, the lamp is not bad.
Usually, a dead lamp can be confirmed by looking at it.  Each lamp contains a thin glass tube.  If this tube is shattered or has a hole melted in it, then it is bad.  Often, people watching the set when the lamp fails will hear a “pop.”  A lamp with a crack, blister, or discoloration in the glass tube (down the center) may also indicate failure. 
Occasionally, a lamp will go bad with no visible internal damage.  This can only be confirmed by substituting a good lamp.  Using an Ohm meter or multi-meter won’t work here as these lamps use Short Arc technology.
When a lamp fails to light, the lamp power supply may make a buzzing or sparking noise caused by the excess high voltage being bled off.  On sets that restart several times, this buzzing may be heard on each restart.  This noise is also an indication of a bad lamp.
Bad lamps usually fail to light when the set is powered on, but weak lamps can also blank out while the set is running.  The set may detect this and attempt to restart the lamp.  If the picture and On Screen Menu  go out intermittently, the lamp is the likely culprit.
Here are some common Failure Modes by manufacturer. Your issue may not be listed here specifically but most of these can apply to multiple models/manufacturers. 
Call our well-trained staff at 1-800-664-6671 or email us at Support@Purelandsupply.com or Sales@PurelandSupply.com if you are not sure if you need a lamp.
 Hitachi
TV starts up with a dark screen, no picture, and no On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the LAMP light on the front of the set stays on constantly.
JVC
TV starts up with a dark screen, no picture, and no On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the blue and orange lights on the front panel blink simultaneously and continuously twice per second.
Failure Mode 1:  Projector starts up, attempts to light the lamp. Possibly hearing the ballast ‘tick’ as it tried to light. Then the Status and power light turn red and the unit shuts down.
Failure Mode 2: (Some models) TV works, but the LAMP lights lights a constant yellow/amber.  This is a warning that the lamp has been used for a certain number of hours and may fail soon.  When you replace the lamp, an on-screen message will ask you to reset the lamp timer, so this warning light turns off.  This must be done using the original TV remote. Set top box remote may not work.
Failure Mode 3: (Some models) Picture flashes, flickers, and/or changes color.  After a few minutes, the set may shutdown.  This may be due to a copy lamp being used.  Make sure the bulb in your lamp is made by Osram of Philips. No-name lamps may cause this issue.
Failure Mode 4:  No fans start when power is pressed. Only the status and power LED flash back and forth.  This indicates the lamp timer as run out and put the unit in protection mode. Refer the manual for proper reset, however most units are reset by holding down the Left and Right directional arrows and Power button on the projector simultaneously for a few seconds to force a timer reset. 
Failure Mode 1: Status Indicator will flash Six times before pausing and then continuing to flash until power is removed. The lamp indicator will also flash on and off until power is removed.
Failure Mode 2: Status light will be off and the lamp indicator will light solid red indicting the lamp has run past 2100 hours and is now in protection mode. This must be reset using the factory remote.  by pressing Help and holding it for about 10 seconds until the Lamp indicator turns off.
Failure Mode 1:  The green POWER light flashes once per second (the normal start-up indication), but the screen is dark with no picture and no On Screen Menu .  The set tries to restart 3 more times, and then the red LAMP light starts blinking.
Failure Mode 2:  The set works OK, but the screen goes dark with no picture or On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the picture comes back on by itself but continues to go on and off by itself.  The green POWER light blinks continuously while the picture is out, and there may or may not be sound.
Failure Mode 3:  The set works, but a lamp warning message appears on the screen each time it is turned on. 
Failure Mode 1:  Lamp will remain lit but display a message “Lamp Failure” before shutting down.
Failure Mode 2: No image at all, and the Red lamp indictor will be lit.
Some models will warn you of imminent failure as the lamp nears its 2000-hour life limit.
Failure Mode 1: Lamp Indicator will flash red with standby indicator steady red.
Failure Mode 2: Lamp indicator will be lit steadily as will the power indicator. 
Failure Mode for TVs.  The red light on the front panel comes on constant, and the green light blinks 3 times per second (the normal start-up indication), but the screen is dark with no picture and no On Screen Menu .  The set shuts down and resets itself 8 times.  Then, the green and red lights blink simultaneously and continuously once per second.
Upon start up the fans will run for a few minutes. You will hear the color wheel spin up and the ballast attempting to start. This will repeat three times until the unit confirms the lamp failure. At that point the indicator for the lamp(s) will flash red instead of green. Some models will flash six times before pausing and then flashing again until the power is removed.

What to Do if Your Lamp Stops Working…

…or if your new lamp does not work read these to see if they can help you.

I installed my lamp and now it won’t turn on. Do I have a defective lamp?


There are a few things to check before contacting customer service that may rectify the situation.

·         Make sure your projector is plugged back in.
·         Is the lamp cover fully secured back into place? The projector will not turn on unless it recognizes this access door is closed.
·         It is always best to unplug the unit when replacing the lamp, so make sure it’s properly plugged into a good power outlet. Maybe unplug and re-plug in the projector to be sure.
My projector is plugged in, but I still am not getting light!


     Listen to the projector when you turn it on.  You should hear the exhaust fans after you press the power button for at least a few minutes while the unit tries to start the lamp.  If you do not hear the fans, it could be an indication that the lamp is not seated properly or the lamp access cover is not secure.  Remove and re-install the lamp and carefully replace the lamp cover.  If you still cannot hear any fans, check your power cord and then check to see if there are indicator lights flashing on the projector.
   If you can hear the fans running and there is still no picture, check for any flashing/solid indicator lights on the projector. These lights are how the unit tells us what is going on within the projector, and has a corresponding reference in the owner’s manual.
  Every projector has an owner’s manual available on line for free.  Check the flashing indicator lights against the description in the owner’s manual.  If the description points to a failed lamp, please contact our Customer Service for further assistance.

My lamp is projecting a picture, but I have a message telling me to replace the lamp.  This is a new lamp, why is it saying that?

     Most Projectors have a Lamp Hour Counter or Lamp Timer to keep track of lamp usage.  The units are designed to warn you when the lamp is approaching the end of its life.  When a new lamp is installed, you must manually reset the timer or the projector will not know the lamp has been changed and will count an incorrect amount of hours.  This also means that if you prematurely reset the timer, you will not have a proper hour count on the replacement lamp once installed.  Some projectors will turn off completely and need to be manually reset before they will turn on if the lamp hours are exceeded beyond the factory settings.
– It is always a good idea to check the manual and reset the timer as instructed.

My projector is much dimmer than I would expect with a new bulb. Do I need to send it back?


     Check to make sure the bulb is installed flush with the front of the housing.  It should sit exactly as the old bulb and must be installed the same way or the light will not illuminate the image correctly. Should the bulb be slightly off center, or not aligned correctly the image can be dim, and you will need to contact PurelandSupply for a Return Authorization (RA) Form.

My projector turns on for a few minutes and turns off after installing the new lamp.

     While this could be a defective lamp, it is common for many Projectors to turn themselves off when there is another issue.  Many times the fans will be dusty and not spin correctly.  That will cause the projector to shut down.  Try cleaning the projector with a vacuum to make sure as much dust and dirt is cleaned up as possible.

I installed the lamp and my projector is telling me that it is getting too hot.


     Anytime you replace your lamp, it is a good idea to clean the unit for dust.  Heat is the primary cause of early lamp failure.  By keeping your TV/Projector clear of dust, you will help it keep the lamp at a proper temperature.  While the lamp is out, use a vacuum cleaner to collect any dust from the lamp compartment and the vents so that it does not re-collect in the TV/Projector.
     This is recommended to be done at least when the lamp is changed, but once every 3-4 months is even better.  With proper maintenance of the TV/Projector, the longer it will last.

I received my lamp but it is not the same as the one I removed.


     It is very rare that there can be multiple lamps for a Projector.  Occasionally the manufacturer will switch lamps mid production, which can be confusing and frustrating. This can be resolved very easily with some help from you.  Record any numbers on the lamp/bulb.  Also verify your model # as well as any letters before or after the model number.  Contact our customer service with the information from your old lamp/bulb and we can correct your order and have the issue taken care of.

My projector has a new lamp, but the color of the screen is still wrong.  I see colors where they shouldn’t be and the picture is either flickering or off color completely. Is my lamp defective?


     Our lamps only project a bright white light.  Your Projector processes the color control by shining the white light thought either a color wheel for DLP or LCD panels for LCD units.  The color can only be affected by the internal optics of the projector.  Generally an off color display will not be noticed with an older lamp as it is not operating at full power. With a new lamp, it will be brighter and show any issues that may have been there previously with a lot more clarity.  A new lamp will NOT resolve this as the issue is with the internal optics.
           

I do not see the answer to my issue.  Is there anyone I can talk to?



     We are always available to help! Please contact us at 1-800-664-6671 Mon-Fri 9:00am-5:00PM and speak with one of our associates. You can also email support@purelandsupply.com or sales@purelandsupply.com, and we will be happy to answer any question you may have. 

Brands We sell Part1

Pureland Supply only sells the highest quality lamps. Our lamps are aftermarket housings engineered to fit the same as the OEM from the manufacturer. 

The brands we carry are:

Acer
Ask
Barco
BenQ
Boxlight
Canon
Christie
Dell
Digital Projection
Dukane
Eiki
Epson
Hewlett Packard
Hitachi
IBM
Infocus
JVC
Knoll
LG
Liesegang
Marantz
Mitsubishi
NEC
Optoma
Panasonic
Philips
Planar
Plus
Projection Design
Proxima
RCA
Runco
Samsung
Samsung
Sanyo
Sharp
Sim2
SmartBoard  
Sony
Toshiba
Ushio
Vidikron
Viewsonic
Vivitek

Contact us Today at www.PurelandSupply.com or give a call and speak to a real person instead of a recording. We are here 9-5 Eastern Standard time. You can also email us at Sales@PurelandSupply.com

Hitachi CP-X306 and it’s DT00841 Lamp

hitachi lcd projector using dt00841

     The Hitachi CP-X306 is an older LCD video projector with a great reputation.  If you own a CP-X306 that uses the DT00841 lamp, you already know of the hi lumen output of 2600 lumens.  For its time, 2600 lumen (2060 in eco mode) was a bright and useful projector.

The CP-X306 was one of the earlier XGA models.  It has a native resolution of 2014 x 768 which would give you a native 720p resolution if used for Home Theater.
hitachi projector lamp dt00841
The DT00841 Lamp runs at 220W and feeds a 0.6” set of LCD panels. That gives the projector a respectable 500:1 contract ratio (respectable for 2008 when the unit was first made).    In data mode, the projector can upscale to 1600 x 1200 dpi.  This isn’t useful for home theater but for certain computer driver display applications it is very useful.
The Input panel is one of the most useful features of the CP-X306. 
The CP-X306 also has the capabilities to support Composite,S-Video, Composite, and Dual VGA in (D-sub 15 pin).  The option to use the network jack is a plus. You can then use a newer OS like Windows 10 to connect via a network, so you can skip finding a VGA cable long enough.  If your needs require it, you can also control it via RS232 or USB.  
The Hitachi CP-X306 is a highly flexible projector.  If you own one or plan to buy a used one on eBay give this link a click to treat your Hitachi to a new lamp.  The DT00841 sold by PurelandSupply.com has an original Ushio brand bulb to ensure proper operation. 
Your Source for replacement projector lamps
Place an order before 5pm Eastern time, and the DT00841 lamp will ship the same day. All lamps have a 180-day replacement warranty. 
Give us a call at 1-800-664-6671 or email us at Sales@PurelandSupply.com