How Close Can I Get? Short Throw Projectors

What is a Short Throw projector? I promise it’s not what you do when your lamp dies early..

Buying a new projector can be daunting. There are so many to pick from. Especially if you need a specific type like a Short throw.  What is a short throw projector you ask and why might you need one?

Sometimes your space doesn’t allow for a standard distance from the screen.  Many basements and home theaters allow the projector to be installed 10-20 foot back from the screen.  Occasionally you need to mount the projector very close (less than 1-5foot back).  The problem then becomes the image cannot be made large enough with the standard lens. This is where the short throw projector comes into play.

A short throw lens uses a special optical design that makes it easy to position the projector close to the screen without sacrificing image size.  You will see this very often in schools.

When the schools use a Smartboard system, it relies entirely on short throw projectors such as the Smartboard UF55 which uses a 20-01032-20.  This lamp with housing uses an original 215W Osram lamp, projecting 2000 lumens via the projectors short throw lens.
These models use the short throw lens design to allow a 100″ image from only 2 feet away. This allows the mounts to be very close to the screen. They both utilize a standard projector lamp, part # but allow a full sized image without sacrificing space.

This can be useful at home. You can use a smaller room and still enjoy movie theater-like image sizes.  The Steelcase Polyvision PJ905 with a 2002031-20 lamp is a short throw projector that supports up to a 1080p input.  There are other models that use short throw lenses as well. Picking the right projector will be a series in this blog by itself so I wont go into it here.

Steelcase Polyvision PJ905 Projector 2002031-001 lamp

Using a short-throw projector at home can save you a lot of setup and configuration hassle. It opens up a lot of spaces that used to not be convenient for a projector. Even if you live in a narrow apartment, a short throw projector can work in as little as 10″ from the screen. Many projectors have a short throw lens as an option.  That would manufacturer dependent.  Buying a lens already installed is also an option.

Stay tuned for our upcoming series on choosing a projector. In the meantime feel free to contact us with any  questions you might have at Support@PurelandSupply.com or Sales@purelandsupply.com

Why Original Inside?

Why Original Bulb Inside over Copy Lamps?
All over the internet you see Projector Lamp ads touting Original Bulb Inside, then you see what looks like the same lamp on a market place site for ¼ the cost.  What gives? 
To answer this question, we first need to look at what these lamps are.
Projector lamps have essentially 3 product types.

       OEM = Original Equipment Manufacturer. This is the company who is branded on the projector.  If you bought a BenQ projector, the OEM lamp would be from BenQ, in a BenQ box (most of the time). These are usually much more expensive and when under warranty, its required by most companies to use the OEM.
        Original Bulb Inside = Not in the original manufacturers box, but has the same brand of bulb and same design of housing as the OEM.  Often the company who makes the lamp for BenQ is the same company that sells the Original Bulb Inside lamp. These are fundamentally the same as an OEM.  They are made to the same engineering requirements and perform as well as the more expensive OEM lamp. Same expected life span as the OEM because they use the same Ushio, Philips, Osram, Phoenix or Iwasaki Bulb as the OEM.
        Compatible/Copy Lamp = Cheapest of all 3 options per unit.  Most expensive when compared by cost to run per hour.  These use copy bulbs or non-original brand bulbs. These are always significantly cheaper by up to a factor of 10!  However, the only savings is in your initial purchase.  On average a copy lamp lasts 70-80% less than the OEM or Original Bulb Inside lamps.  They also are significantly poor at color reproduction because of the chemicals used inside to copy the more expensive lamps.  There is next to no quality control in the Copy lamp market.
I am going to focus on Original Bulb Inside versus Copy Lamps here.  OEMs have their place and will always, but I want to show why Copy lamps are not all they are cracked up to be. Hopefully I will save you some hassle and ideally some money…
Why is a Copy lamp so much cheaper yet I say they cost you more to run per hour?  That will make sense once I explain.  The copy lamp may be $40 new for a Mitsubishi VLT-HC910LP.  Your life expectancy of that lamp is 2000 hours (in most cases that is what the OEM is designed for). That Copy lamp is not made as well as the Original bulb.  The bulb is using gases and manufacturing methods to ensure it can be sold cheap. That will guarantee the life expectancy is significantly lower. I may get 200-400 hours if you are lucky.

That means I need to buy another $40 lamp and get another 400 hours (I am being generous at 400 hours) …. I end up buying 5 lamps at $40 apiece to get your full 2000 hours that I am expecting. Plus, I must contact the Copy lamp seller and deal with the returns process and waiting for the new Copy lamp and then having to put it in and reset the timer each time and clean out the likely piles of broken glass from when the last Copy lamp exploded…just so much hassle for no savings once it’s all said and done.

The Copy lamp cost me $0.10 an hour to run, plus all the return shipping, hours spent troubleshooting and dealing with the replacement and lost time enjoying the projector.  There are other problems with copy lamps such as color quality and brightness problems but those are not as quantifiable.
The Original Bulb Inside VLT-HC910LP is less than $140 new.  Sure, that is almost 4 times the cost of the copy lamp. How can that be cheaper?  Let’s do the cost per hour math and see…
Copy lamp = $40 new, 400hr lifespan, 5 x $40 = $200 for 2000hours of use.  Plus, RMA shipping fees, restocking fees and hassle.  Your Quantifiable cost per hour to get 2000 hours of use us $0.10 per hour. Seems cheap right?
Original Bulb Inside Lamp = $138.00 new, 2000hours life span. No replacing it at 400 hours or less.
Your cost per hour is $0.069 or 7 cents an hour!  That adds up over the life of the projector. 
Original Bulb Inside lamps are a wonderful cost-effective option to enjoy your projector.  You get the same level of quality (in some cases higher quality) for a much cheaper price than the OEM.
Copy lamps only seem cheap when you see the initial cost.  Extrapolating that over the life of the projector makes it obvious that your savings vanish the moment you install that copy lamp.
Pureland Supply prides itself on only selling OEM and Original Bulb Inside lamps.
We pride ourselves in our commitment to Customer Service, Quality and Reasonable prices.
Browse our lamp sections or search for your model. If you rather talk to a human, give us a call where you never have to ‘press 1 for an representative’.